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DS40 printing a little dark [Archive] - Event Photographer Society Forum

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Jason Goodlad
08-11-2010, 09:30 PM
Hi Guys,
We have a DS40, running with Windows XP, Picassa and Canon cameras.
When doing outdoor equestrian events, the pictures are fine, but when doing an indoor evening event, the pictures look fine on the screen, but a little dark when printed. Any ideas?
Cheers guys.

Sue.

Scott Kirk-Matthewson
08-11-2010, 10:13 PM
Hi sue, I have had the same happen to me (prob my own fault for being lazy and not calibrating the screen)

what I found was playing around with the brightness settings in the drivers helped a bit, made it acceptable anyway!

Jason Goodlad
09-11-2010, 08:00 AM
Hi sue, I have had the same happen to me (prob my own fault for being lazy and not calibrating the screen)

what I found was playing around with the brightness settings in the drivers helped a bit, made it acceptable anyway!
Hi Scott,
Thank you for you reply, I have calibrated the screens, can I ask you if you do all the same type of events or just Black Tie? The reason I ask is when I make adjustments in the drivers, I wonder if I need to change them back when I do the equestrian events as it seems fine forr that. I will try anyway and let you all know!

Thanks again,

Sue

Bryan Osborne
09-11-2010, 08:05 AM
Calibrate the screen accurately, profile the printer acurately..If the printing looks too dark in the final result in one of your disciplines then brighten the photo using the controls in your workflow software DO NOT change the brightness and contrast of your screen settings as this will instantly invalidate its overall calibration.....

If you do not have a workflow software that allows you to make "local work" modifications to the original image and to store these modifications as temporary defaults then this should be looked at.

You should calibrate your monitor regularily..

Bryan

Mark Eaton
09-11-2010, 08:45 AM
Sue,

Bryan is absolutely correct. Once your monitor has been calibrated correctly and you are using the correct driver for your printer, any corrections needed from event to event should be carried out in camera. You should definitely not be altering your monitor settings or driver software, in an attempt to achieve a correct print, as this compromises your colour managed workflow.

Mark.

Alan Warner
09-11-2010, 09:09 AM
but when doing an indoor evening event, the pictures look fine on the screen, but a little dark when printed

Hi Sue,

In an ideal world you should be able to shoot with the studio lights and print without modification to the image

I hardly ever need to make any exposure adjustments using studio lighting, instead prefering to get the exposure spot on & ignoring the monitor for brightness & contrast as this can vary due to other external factors,

Are you using the screen image & adjusting prior to printing at black tie ect,

If so using a screen calibration device is recommended but I fear not the only issue here...


Al'

Jason Goodlad
09-11-2010, 09:30 AM
Hi Guys,

Sorry for the ignorance but what do you mean by the correct drivers for my printer?

Sue

Alan Warner
09-11-2010, 09:51 AM
Photomart Page for the DNP's

http://www.photomart.co.uk/content/cont ... phome.html (http://www.photomart.co.uk/content/contentextra/dnp/dnphome.html)

Try downloading the newer driver if yours is older, but i doubt its the issue...

Al'

simon coates
09-11-2010, 09:52 AM
I hardly ever need to make any exposure adjustments using studio lighting, instead prefering to get the exposure spot on & ignoring the monitor for brightness & contrast as this can vary due to other external factors,


Spot on Alan. To me, how it looks on the screen is largely irrelevant, just so long as the print matches what the camera saw. Life's too short to be fiddling around with brightness/contrast/colour balance in the workflow. Getting it right in camera is the safest bet.


Sorry for the ignorance but what do you mean by the correct drivers for my printer?

Just make sure that the printer drivers you are using are the most up-to-date. Check with the manufacturer's website and see when the last version was released.

Simon

Duncan Harris
09-11-2010, 10:24 AM
.....I hardly ever need to make any exposure adjustments using studio lighting, instead prefering to get the exposure spot on & ignoring the monitor for brightness & contrast as this can vary due to other external factors......
Al'

I agree with what you're saying in a controlled environment but Sue is also talking about outdoor equestrian events where ideally you should get exposure dead on but coping with different coloured horses from light grays to blacks and lighting from front and to back lit fences all within a very minutes doesn't make it easy.

Could the problem be the ambient light you are viewing your screen with ? Indoors is dark so image appears lighter so adjusting will make the actual print darker. Some black tie events it's so dark you can't even see the colour of the money, now that really does worry me :D

Mark Amies
09-11-2010, 12:23 PM
Probably going to bore you all now.

I used to have this problem ( ambient light) in my last job - I was doing photo correction work, and the area I worked in had strong light coming through in the morning, and so in the afternoon, al my colours were out.

The problem was soleved by shipping us all down to a room with the natural light knocked out all day , and just controllled lighting.

Doesn't help Sue, but it illustrates the point. I guessth eonly thing would be some kind of cowl over the display, the sort of thing that Lacie used to do.-

http://www.lacie.com/ca/products/product.htm?pid=11095

That is just for illustrative purposes. From waht I remeber mine used to be a vinyl covered structure that velcro'd onto the monitor.

Alan Warner
09-11-2010, 01:54 PM
Re-reading Sue's post I read it as the problem was with the Black Tie Indoor stuff, I may be wrong :?

Al'

Michael Martin
09-11-2010, 07:28 PM
If working from a laptop, be aware that many newer ones have a default setting to adjust the screen brightness according to the ambient light. Great for office work, but lousy for photo work. Turn this feature off. Then the simplest solution is to get a print you know is correctly exposed, view it alongside the screen you will be using in subdued light and adjust the screen brightness to match, make a note of this setting and leave it alone. You can now calibrate at this brightness if you so wish. In future if the screen is hard to see in a bright environment, get a cover for it. I bought a black tent for this very reason.
If all the images still seem a little dark, then maybe a simple +/- shift of the exposure in camera will sort the issue out.
Most computer screens are too bright for critical work and often need turning down towards the lowest setting without turning them off.

Mike Weeks
09-11-2010, 07:51 PM
Obviously you are using a light meter because that is what you should trust and not the screen. your light meter may be 1/125 f8 at ISO 200 but that may not be the required setting on your camera as it could be up to a stop either way but more likely up to half a stop.

Next take some shots under the lights use a test target and print. If the lights were set as previously mentioned then take at f5.6, f6.3, f7.1, f8, f9, f10, f11 for example (changing camera settings) - print all and compare to test target. Make the choice of what best represents the target and then you have the correct setting to meter for after doing a little conversion. If the best print is f5.6 then in future meter for f11 and shoot at f8 or if f9 were the best print then meter for f7.1. he best is obviously camera f8 and print f8.

There is however an issue and that is that lighting sources are generally not even across the field of light so it is important to meter in the same manner each time.

Mike