Warning: Function get_magic_quotes_gpc() is deprecated in /home/eventpho/public_html/forum/includes/class_core.php on line 1960
photographing a communion ( white ) dresse, on a White back [Archive] - Event Photographer Society Forum

PDA

View Full Version : photographing a communion ( white ) dresse, on a White back



Thomas Dixon
13-05-2010, 03:04 PM
Hi all I have been asked to take some photos of a girl in her 1st communion dress,and also her family, my problem is I mostly only use White back grounds ( 3mtrs by 5 mtrs ) with two Studio lamps , I am very worry I will over expose everything due to the snow white dress and the back ground. the only other back ground I have is actually Blue ( digital removal Blue) Can anyone suggest a set-up where there would be a visible difference between the dress and the background ? I personal was going to set-up about 1 stop under the TTL settings and then play with the RAW tool in PS2 !

Amanda Wigmore
13-05-2010, 03:14 PM
I would have thought that overexposing the background using one of the lights and then metering for the dress lighting the girl with the other light would be a good start. Or pull the girl away from the backdrop, get the lights near her and on as low as you can, this should mean the light falls off before reaching the background thus making it more off white/grey.
Failing that, I'd use both lights on the backdrop to make it blow out and use my onboard flash and defuser to meter for the dress. Blowing out the background needs to be done carefully though to avoid blowing out the edge of the model.
I think.....
x

Graham Gott
13-05-2010, 10:57 PM
I am very worry I will over expose everything due to the snow white dress and the back ground....
.... I personal was going to set-up about 1 stop under the TTL settings and then play with the RAW tool in PS2 !

This is a wind up, right?

Ed Brown
14-05-2010, 03:16 AM
Amanda has raised some v.good points here, I doubt this is a wind up, however it is public so i would suggest we all act in a constructive manner.

I would shoot 2:1 so say backdrop is f22 and the subject is f16. Are you using strip softboxes on the back or are you using flags (not the waving sort!)

Its the distance that will make the most difference, the further away from backdrop you can get the better to create good separation.

Are you using reflector / tri-flector / bounce boards ? I would hope so but not essential but would give the images much more bite.

Im sure there will be some great advice here, I mean there are hundreds of photos a week with people who have a white dress / shirt at events on a white backdrop, so the advice will be plenty

good luck

dont forget to post the images too

all the best

gary evans
14-05-2010, 07:28 AM
Shoot in manual and set your background lights to overexpose the background by one stop as Ed says. You wont get the correct exposure using TTL settings.

I would try and and get your subject at least 1.5 metres from the background and preferably more and have them lit seperately.

If you get your exposure correct you wont need to do anything to a RAW image, or a JPEG for that matter.

The image below was shot in JPEG and has no work done afterwards.

http://www.ballphotographers.com/images/white_on_white.jpg

Thomas Dixon
14-05-2010, 09:55 PM
sorry you felt this was a joke, but unlike you i havent a life times experience in the business,


[quote="Thomas Dixon":7c26505t]I am very worry I will over expose everything due to the snow white dress and the back ground....
.... I personal was going to set-up about 1 stop under the TTL settings and then play with the RAW tool in PS2 !

This is a wind up, right?[/quote:7c26505t]

Thomas Dixon
14-05-2010, 10:04 PM
Cheers thanks for the advice i will put it to go use ,


Shoot in manual and set your background lights to overexpose the background by one stop as Ed says. You wont get the correct exposure using TTL settings.

I would try and and get your subject at least 1.5 metres from the background and preferably more and have them lit seperately.

If you get your exposure correct you wont need to do anything to a RAW image, or a JPEG for that matter.

The image below was shot in JPEG and has no work done afterwards.

http://www.ballphotographers.com/images/white_on_white.jpg

Thomas Dixon
14-05-2010, 10:07 PM
Thanks Ed, for your advice and time , I will try put as much of your advice ino the shoot, thanks again


Amanda has raised some v.good points here, I doubt this is a wind up, however it is public so i would suggest we all act in a constructive manner.

I would shoot 2:1 so say backdrop is f22 and the subject is f16. Are you using strip softboxes on the back or are you using flags (not the waving sort!)

Its the distance that will make the most difference, the further away from backdrop you can get the better to create good separation.

Are you using reflector / tri-flector / bounce boards ? I would hope so but not essential but would give the images much more bite.

Im sure there will be some great advice here, I mean there are hundreds of photos a week with people who have a white dress / shirt at events on a white backdrop, so the advice will be plenty

good luck

dont forget to post the images too

all the best

Graham Gott
15-05-2010, 12:11 AM
sorry you felt this was a joke, but unlike you i havent a life times experience in the business

My apologies if this was a genuine question. As many people will confirm, I will be the first to offer help to a beginner. It's just that I don't expect to have to do it on a professional forum. I also don't think you need a 'life time' of experience to know that photographing a white dress on a white background using TTL will under expose an image - not over expose it. Even allowing for the fact you may have made a typo, you went on to suggest underexposing by one stop to correct it.

So, my mistake for thinking someone was pulling my chain....

Graham Taylor
15-05-2010, 08:08 AM
I think this is a good lesson for any novice that you really need to know how to use studio lighting. Its easy to setup for events and with hilites you cant really go wrong but knowing how to handle different situations and/or achieve different effects does require some training.

BTW the answers to your dilema are in Amanda, Ed's & Gary's posts. Read them until you understand and if you still are unsure contact one of them and talk in person.

RobMarsh
15-05-2010, 09:15 AM
Take on board the advice given, and I would suggest you try and have a practice with the background and anybody in a white shirt or dress.

If you look nervous or under confident on the shoot, the people will pick up on it. If you practice setting the camera, setting the lights playing with the distance from the background, shoot tethered and instantly see the images, you can learn from the practice in a big way